movies criteria 8

Release year: 1988 Director: Mike Nichols Screenwriter: Kevin Wade Starring: Melanie Griffth, Sigourney Weaver, Harrison Ford, Joan Cusack, Alec Baldwin, Philip Bosco, Oliver Platt, Nora Dunn Ratings: 1 Oscar: Best Original Song. 5 Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Actress (Melanie Griffith), Best Supporting Actress (Joan Cusack), Best Supporting Actress (Sigourney Weaver), Best Director. 4 Golden ..

Summary 8.0 great
movies criteria 8
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Summary 8.0 great

Working Girl

working girl official poster

Release year: 1988

Director: Mike Nichols

Screenwriter: Kevin Wade

Starring: Melanie Griffth, Sigourney Weaver, Harrison Ford, Joan Cusack, Alec Baldwin, Philip Bosco, Oliver Platt, Nora Dunn

Ratings: 1 Oscar: Best Original Song. 5 Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Actress (Melanie Griffith), Best Supporting Actress (Joan Cusack), Best Supporting Actress (Sigourney Weaver), Best Director. 4 Golden Globes: Best Comedy/Musical, Best Actress (Melanie Griffith), Best Supporting Actress (Sigourney Weaver), Best Original Song. 2 Golden Globes nominations: Best Director, Best Screenplay.

Determined to get ahead in the business world smart secretary Tess McGill (Melanie Griffith) happily moves on to a position working for power woman Katharine Parker (Sigourney Weaver) who she feels listens to her instead of seeing her as a sexual object. But when Katharine goes away Tess discovers her boss has deceived her and she decides enough is enough and sets out to make it to the top, no matter what.

Working Girl is one of the ground pillars of Melanie Griffith’s (Body Double, 1984) career skyrocketing it after a slump due to addiction problems. She received a well-deserved Oscar nomination for her performance as the bright young woman struggling to be taken seriously. Despite being up against major talents like Weaver (Aliens, 1986) and Ford (Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1981) Griffith has no problem making herself the star, with her quiet, gentle tone and doe-eyed looks never stopping her from showing the strenght inside her. Her character is full-embodied and her performance allow us to sense every emotion she goes through on her path to succes. Weaver on the other hand is a delight as the cunning back-stabber making it joyful to root against her while Ford luckily feels secure enough to stand a bit down and merely support his leading lady in shinning. This is a movie that screams the 1980s and it takes some time to be able to look past the hairspray endused hairstyles and the shoulderpads, but once you let yourself emerge into the story it soon becomes clear, that this is a subject that is, frighteningly, as relevant today.

Moviegeek info:

Sigourney Weaver and Melanie Griffith followed several female executives and secretaries on their hectic daily schedules in New York City and sat in during meetings to get a better idea of the industry from the female perspective.

 

Picture copyright: SF Film

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