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Release Year: 1994 Director: Quentin Tarantino Screenwriter(s): Quentin Tarantino (screenplay and story), Roger Avary (story) Starring: John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Samuel L. Jackson, Tim Roth, Amanda Plummer, Bruce Willis, Harvey Keitel, Ving Rhames, Eric Stoltz, Roseanna Arquette Rating: Won 1 Oscar: Best Original Screenplay. 6 Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (John Travolta), Best Supporting ..

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Pulp Fiction

pulpfictionposter

Release Year: 1994

Director: Quentin Tarantino

Screenwriter(s): Quentin Tarantino (screenplay and story), Roger Avary (story)

Starring: John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Samuel L. Jackson, Tim Roth, Amanda Plummer, Bruce Willis, Harvey Keitel, Ving Rhames, Eric Stoltz, Roseanna Arquette

Rating: Won 1 Oscar: Best Original Screenplay. 6 Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (John Travolta), Best Supporting Actress (Uma Thurman), Best Supporting Actor (Samuel L. Jackson), Best Editing. Won 1 Golden Globe: Best Screenplay. 5 Golden Globes nominations: Best Picture – Drama, Best Director, Best Actor – Drama (John Travolta), Best Supporting Actress (Uma Thurman), Beat Supporting Actor (Samuel L. Jackson).

 

The lives of two mob henchmen (John Travolta & Samuel L. Jackson), their boss’ wife (Uma Thurman), a boxer (Bruce Willis), and two criminals about to rob a diner (Tim Roth & Amanda Plummer) intertwine in a tale of violence and redemption.

 

Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction has since its release in 1994 earned a reputation as a modern classic; its characters are beloved, its lines endlessly quotable in best Tarantino style. The story pursues several interconnected storylines, but centres around (possible because it’s the one most often connected with the movie as a whole) the story of two unfortunate henchmen played by Samuel L. Jackson (Unbreakable, 2000) and John Travolta (Saturdau Night Fever, 1977). The fact that Travolta landed the role is both a case of brilliant casting and sheer luck. The part was written with Michael Madsen (Kill Bill vol. 2, 2004) in mind, but a couple of weeks before the script was done he backed out due to scheduling conflicts. Travolta was cast instead, which was seen an unusual choice at the time as he had just come off the movie Look Who’s Talking Now (1993), but the role of Vincent Vega brought Travolta back into the limelight and made his dance moves cool again. It is hard to delve into much of the six narratives within the movie without spoiling much of the fun for first time viewers. It surfices to know that this is a fast-talking, well acted, stylish, cool, fun, violent, surprising, movie and essential viewing in the Tarantino canon.

 

Moviegeek Info:

The waiter at Jackrabbit Slim’s called “Buddy Holly” (Steve Buscemi) asks Uma Thurman’s character if she wants her $5 milkshake ‘Martin and Lewis or Amos and Andy’. This Refers to two comedy duos: Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis (two white guys) and the two leads of The Amos ‘n Andy Show (two black guys). He is basically asking her is she wants a vanilla or a choclate milk shake.

 

Picture Copyright: Nordisk Film

1 Comment

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